OSU Libraries | OSU Home

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

Narrative of a Journey across the Rocky Mountains, to the Columbia River, and a Visit to the Sandwich Islands, Chili, etc., with a Scientific Appendix

Chapter I

Arrival at St. Louis--Preparations for the journey--Saque Indians--Their appearance, dress, and manners--Squaws--Commencement of a pedestrian tour--Sandhill cranes--Prairie settlers--Their hospitality--Wild pigeons, golden plovers, and prairie hens--Mr. P. and his duaghters--An abundant repast--Simplicity of the prairie maidens--A deer and turkey hunt--Loutre Lick hotel--A colored charon--Comfortable quarters--Young men of the west--Reflections on leaving home--Loquacity of the inhabitants-Gray squirrels--Boonville-Parroquets--Embarkation in a steamboat--Large Catfish--Accident on board the boat--Arrival at Independence--Description of the town--Encampment of the Rocky Mountain company--Character of the man--Preparation for departure--Requisites of a leader--Backwoods familiarity--Milton Sublette and his band--Rev. Jason Lee, the missionary--A letter from home--Mormonites--Military discipline and its consequences.


Chapter II

Departure of the caravan--A storm on the prairie--Arrangement of the camp--Kanzas Indians-Kanzas river--Indian lodges--Passage of the river-Buffalo canoes-Kanzas chief--Upper Kaw village--Their wigwams--Catfish and ravens--Return of Mr. Sublette--Pawnee trace--Desertion of three men--Difficulties occasioned by losing the trail--Intelligence of Mr. Sublette's party--Escape of the band of horses-Visit of three Otto Indians--Anecdote of Richardson, the chief hunter-his appearance and character--White wolves and antelopes--Buffalo bones--Sublette's deserted camps--Lurking wolves.


Chapter III

Arrival at the Platte river--Wolves and antelopes--Anxiety of the men to see buffalo--Visit of two spies from the Grand Pawnees--Forced march-- A herd of buffalo--Elk--Singular conduct of the horses--Killing a buffalo--Indian mode of procuring buffalo--Great herd--Adventure with an Indian in the tent--Indian feat with bow and arrow--Notice of the Pawnee tribes--Disappearance of the buffalo from the plains of the Platte--A hunting adventure--Killing a buffalo--Butchering of a bull--Shameful destruction of the game--Hunters' mode of quenching thirst.


Chapter IV

Change in the face of the country--Unpleasant visitation--N. fork of the Platte--A day's journey over the hills--Poor pasture--Marmots--Rattlesnake and gopher--Naturalist's success and sacrifices--A sand storm--Wild Horses--Killing of a doe antelope--Bluffs--The Chimney--"Zip Koon," the young antelope--Birds--Feelings and cogitations of a naturalist--Laramie's fork--Departure of two "free trappers" on a summer "hunt"--Black hills--Red butes--Sweet-water river and Rock Independence--Avocets--Wind river mountains--Rocky Mountain sheep--Adventure with a grizzly bear--Rattlesnakes--Toilsome march, and arrival at Sandy river--Suffering of the horses--Anticipated delights of the rendezvous.

Chapter V

Arrival at the Colorado--The author in difficulty--Loss of a journal, and advice to traveling tyros--The rendezvuos--Motley groups infesting it--Rum drinking, swearing, and other accomplishments in vogue--Description of the camp--Trout--Abundance of game--Cock of the plains--Leave the rendezvous--An accession to the bank--A renegado Blackfoot chief--Captain Stewart and Mr. Ashworth--Muddy creek--More carousing--Abundance of trout--Bear river--A hard day's march--Volcanic country--White-clay pits and "Beer spring"--Rare birds and common birds--Mr. Thomas McKay--Captain Bonneville's party--Captains Stewart and Wyeth's visit to the lodge of the "bald chief"--Blackfoot river--Adventures with a grizzly bear--Death of "Zip Koon"--Young grizzly bears and buffalo calves--A Blackfoot Indian--Dangerous experiment of McKay--the three "Teatons"--Large trout--Shoshone river--Site of "Fort Hall"--Preparations for a buffalo hunt.


Chapter VI

Departure of the hunting camp--A false alarm--Blackfeet Indians--Requisites of a mountain-man--Good fare, and good appetites--An experiment--Grizzly bears--Nez Perce Indian--Adventure with a grizzly bear--Hunters' anecdotes--Homeward bound--Arrival at "Fort Hall"--A salute--Emaciation from low diet--Mr. McKay's company--Buffalo lodges--Effects of judicious training--Indian worship--A "Camp Meeting"--Mr. Jason Lee, a favorite--A fatal accident and a burial.


Chapter VII

Departure of McKay's party, Captain Stewart, and the missionaries--Debauch at the fort--Departure of the company--Poor provision--Blackfeet hunting ground--Sufferings from thirst--Goddin's creek--Antoine Goddin, the trapper--Scarcity of game--A buffalo--Rugged mountains--More game--Unusual economy--Habits of the white wolf--"Thornburg's pass"--Difficult travelling--The captain in jeapardy among the snow--A countermarch--Deserted Banneck camp--Toilsome and dangerous passage of the mountain--Mallade river--Beaver dams, and beaver--A party of Snake Indians--Another Banneck camp--"Kamas prairie''--Indian mode of preparing the kamas--Racine blanc, or biscuit root--Loss of horses by fatigue--Boisee or Big-wood river--Salmon--Choke-cherries etc.


Chapter VIII

A substitute for game, and a luxurious breakfast--Expectations of a repast, and a disappointment--Visit of a Snake chief--his abhorrence of horse meat--A band of Snake Indians--their chief--Trade with Indians for Salmon--Mr. Ashworth's adventure--An Indian horse-thief--Visit to the Snake camp--its filthiness--A Banneck camp--Supercilious conduct of the Indians--Arrival at Snake river--Equipment of a trapping party--Indian mode of catching salmon--Loss of a favorite horse--Powder river--Cut rocks--Recovery of the lost trail--Grande Ronde--Captain Bonneville--his fondness for a roving life--Kayouse and Nez Perce Indians--their appearance--An Indian beauty--Blue mountains-A feline visit.


Chapter IX

Passage of the Blue Mountains--Sufferings from thirst--Utalla river--A transformation--A novel meal--Walla-walla river--Columbia river and Fort Walla-walla--A dinner with the missionaries--Anecdote for Mr. Lee--A noble repast--Brief notice of the Fort--Departure of the missionaries--Notice of the Walla-walla indians--Departure for Fort Vancouver--Wild ducks--Indian graves--Indian horses--Visits from Indians--Ophthalmia, a prevalent disease--Rough travelling--A company of Chinook Indians--The Dalles--The party joined by Captain Wyeth--Embarkation in canoes--A heavy Gale--Dangerous navigation--Pusillanimous conduct of an Indian helmsman--A zealous botanist--Departure of Captain Wyeth with five men--Cascades--A portage--Meeting with the missionaries--Loss of a canoe--A toilsome duty--Arrival at Fort Vancouver--reflections suggested by it--Dr. John McLoughlin, the chief factor--Domiciliation of the travellers at Fort Vancouver.


Chapter X

Fort Vancouver--Agricultural and other improvements--Vancouver "camp"--Approach of the rainy season--Expedition to the Wallammet--The falls-A village of Klikatat Indians--Manner of flattening the head--A Flathead infant--Brig "May Dacre"--Preparations for a settlement--success of the naturalists--Chinook Indians--their appearance and costume--Ague and fever--Superstitious dread of the Indians--Desertion of the Sandwich Islanders from Captain Wyeth's party--Embarkation for a trip to the Islands--George, the Indian pilot--Mount Coffin--A visit to the tombs--Superstition--Visit to an Indian house--Fort George--Site of Astoria--A blind Indian boy--Cruel and unfeeling conduct of the savages--their moral character--Baker's Bay--Cape Disappointment--Dangerous bar at the entrance of the river--The sea beach--Visit of Mr. Ogden--Passage across the Bar--Sea Birds--Landsmen at sea--A sperm Whale--Albatrosses, etc.--Tropic birds--A "school" of whales--Dolphins--Make the Sandwich Islands--Oahu--A rhapsody.


Chapter XI

Honoruru--Native canoes--Amphibious habits--Captain Charlton, his Britanic Majesty's consul--Mr. Jones, the American consul--reception by him--Description of the town, and of the natives--Party-colored hair of the women--The pagoda--A visit from Rev. Hiram Bingham, the missionary--Opinions regarding the missionary fraternity--First view of the king, Kauikeaouli--his train--Seaman's chapel--A visit to the native church--Kinau and Kekuanoa--Orderly conduct of the natives during worship--Introduction to the king--His fondness for the chase, and athletic exercises--Native food--Manner of eating--The rumi-rumi--its efficacy--A Luau party--The valley of Nuano--A visit to the Pari--The last battle of Tamehemaha--A Feast--Manner of cooking--A party of native ladies--An adventure.


Chapter XII

Visit to the island of Kauai--A royal call--Rev. P.J. Gulick, the missionary--Description of the island--A present from Kauikeaouli--Royal mode of obtaining supplies--A change of residence--Excursions through the country--Birds--Native method of catching them--The travellers wind-bound--Shell hunting--Habits of the native--Beach food, and mode of eating it--Visit of the king, and the governor Kekeoeva--Characteristics of the latter--Anxiety of the king to return home--Arrival of his followers--A metamorphosis--A royal supper--Evening service--Royal guard--A sail in sight--Joy of the king--His letter--Return of the Avon--Departure from Kauai, and arrival at Oahu--A pic-nic party at Pearl river--Calabash dance by the natives--Departure for Columbia river--A primitive passage to the shore--A storm at sea--A flight of shore birds--Land ahead--Arrival at the Columbia.


Chapter XIII

Passage up the Columbia--Birds--A trip to the Wallammet--Methodist missionaries--their prospects--Fort William--Band-tail pigeons--Wretched condition of the Indians at the falls--Akallapooyah village--Indian cemetery--Superstitions--Treatment of diseases--Method of steaming--"Making medicene"--Indian sorcerers--An interruption of festivities--Death of Thornburg--An inquest--Verdict of the jury--Inordinate appetite for ardent spirits--Misfortunes of the American Company--Eight men drowned--Murder of two trappers by the Banneck Indians--Arrival of Captain Thing--His meeting and skirmish with the Blackfeet Indians--Massacre--A narrow escape. .


Chapter XIV

Indians of the Columbia--their melancholy condition--Departure of Mr. Nuttall and Dr. Gairdner--A new vocation--Arrival of the Rev. Samuel Parker--his object--Departure of the American brig--Swans--Indian mode of taking them--A large wolf--An Indian mummy--A night adventure--A discovery, and restoration of stolen property--Fraternal tenderness of an Indian--Indian vengeance--Death of Waskema, the Indian girl--"Busy-body" the little chief--A village of Kowalitsk Indians--Ceremony of"Making Medicine"--Exposure of an imposter--Success of legitimate medicines--Departure from Fort Vancouver for a visit to the interior--Arrival of a stranger--"Cape Horn"--Tilki, the Indian chief--Indian villages--Arrival at Fort Walla-walla--Sharp-tailed grouse--Commencement of a journey to the Blue mountains.


Chapter XV

A village of Kayouse Indians--their occupation--appearance and dresses of the women--family worship--its good effects--Visit to the Blue mountains--Dusky grouse--Return to Walla-walla--Arrival of Mr. McLeod, and the missionairies--Letters from home--Death of Antoine Goddin, the trapper--A renegado white man--Assault by the Wall-walla Indians--Missionary duties--Passage down the Columbia--Rapids--A dog for supper--Prairies on fire--A nocturnal visit--Fishing Indians--Their romantic appearance--Salmon huts--The shoots--Dangerous navigation--Death of Tilki--Seals--Indian stoicism and contempt of pain--Skookoom, the strong chief--his death--Maiming, an evidence of grief--Arrival at Fort Vancouver--A visit to Fort George--Indian Cemeteries--Lewis and Clarke's house--A medal--Visit to Chinook--Hospitality of the Indians--Chinamus' house--The idol Canine inmates.


Chapter XVI

Northern excursion--Salmon--Indian mode of catching them--Flathead children--A storm on the bay--Pintail ducks--Simple mode of killing salmon--Return to Chinook--Indian garrulity--Return to Fort George--Preparations for a second trip to the Sandwich Islands--Detention within the cape--The tropics, and tropic girds--Make the Island of Maui--Arrival at Oahu--Accession to the society--A visit to the king--Illness of the princess--Harieta Nahienaena--Abrupt exit of the king--A ride to Waititi--Cocoanut--Native mode of climbing--Death of the princess-grief of her people--Barbarous ceremonies--Residence in the valley of Nuano--A visit to the palace--Kahiles--Coffin of the princess, and inscription--Appurtenances--Ceremony of carrying the body to the church--Description of the pageant--Dress of the king--Conclusion of the ceremony.


Chapter XV

A village of Kayouse Indians--their occupation--appearance and dresses of the women--family worship--its good effects--Visit to the Blue mountains--Dusky grouse--Return to Walla-walla--Arrival of Mr. McLeod, and the missionairies--Letters from home--Death of Antoine Goddin, the trapper--A renegado white man--Assault by the Wall-walla Indians--Missionary duties--Passage down the Columbia--Rapids--A dog for supper--Prairies on fire--A nocturnal visit--Fishing Indians--Their romantic appearance--Salmon huts--The shoots--Dangerous navigation--Death of Tilki--Seals--Indian stoicism and contempt of pain--Skookoom, the strong chief--his death--Maiming, an evidence of grief--Arrival at Fort Vancouver--A visit to Fort George--Indian Cemeteries--Lewis and Clarke's house--A medal--Visit to Chinook--Hospitality of the Indians--Chinamus' house--The idol Canine inmates.


Chapter XVII

Embarkation for a tour of the islands--Lahaina--Forts--Lahainaluna--Missionaries of Maui--High school--Progress of the pupils--Karakakua bay--Kairua--Cook's rock--reverence of the natives for his memory--cook's monument--Birds--Kawaihae--Colossal mountains--Mrs. Young--Heiau, or native temple--Human sacrifices--Morai--Heathenish rites--A cargo of cattle--Unsavory practice of the native women--Departure from Oahu--A sail by moonlight--Dean's island--A "complaisant"--Arrival at Tahiti--Native pilot--Papeete' bay--Appearance of the shore--Visit from foreigners--A ramble on shore--Orange groves, etc.--A young native songster--Visit to the queen--Mr. Pritchard, the missionary--Native service--The chapel--A bedridden tahaitian--Jungle fowls--Leave the harbor--Dangerous navigation--A narrow escape--A shipwreck.


Chapter XVIII

Island of Eimeo--Juan Fernandez--Make the coast of Chili--The shore--Town of Valparaiso--Suburbs--Indisposition--Kindness of the foreign residents, etc.--Preparation by the Chilian government for an expedition against Peru--Foreign adventurers--Dissaffection of Vidaurre and other officers in the Chilian army--Murder of Signor Portales by the rebels--Preparation for invading the town of Valparaiso--consternation on the inhabitants--A battle--defeat of the insurgents--Capture and imprisonment of Vidaurre and seven officers--Florine, the murderer--Sentence of the court martial--A Military execution--Appearance of the bodies after death--Sail for the United States--Cape Horn--Pernambuco--Cape Henlopen--A gale--Arrival at Philadelphia.


Appendix

Catalogue of Quadrupeds Found in the Territory of the Oregon.
Catalogue of Birds Found in the Territory of the Oregon.


Notes

Member of AAUP