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August 6th, 2015

 

Behind every incredible book is a hardworking author. The kind of author who is willing to trek into fields every morning, or take their dinner amidst a stack of books. These writers pour passion into their work, attempting to convey via pen or keyboard a revelation that they simply need to share with others. And while we as readers certainly enjoy the end product of their labors, rarely do we discover the people behind the pages.

So, before you’re able to delve into our forthcoming fall list, we thought a brief introduction was in order. Readers, meet our Fall 2015 writers:

 

 

Author: Michael Helquist Helquist

Book: Marie Equi: Radical Politics and Outlaw Passions

Release Month: September

Website: http://www.michaelhelquist.com/

Occupation: Historian, journalist, editor, and activist

Quick Fact: Helquist’s interest in the project stemmed in part from the modern relevance of Equi’s struggles. “How Equi fought for justice makes her life story compelling to general readers and scholars interested in the issues of her day and to anyone committed to similar challenges today,” he explains on his blog.

 

 

Author: Max G. Geier Geier

Book: The Color of Night: Race, Railroaders, and Murder in the Wartime West

Release Month: October

Website: http://www.wou.edu/~geierm/

Occupation: Professor of History, Emeritus

Quick Fact: Geier’s areas of scholarly specialization include public history, environmental history, and North American history. He is the author of two books on the history of forest science research in the Pacific Northwest.

 

 

Author: Sue Armitage Armitage

Book: Shaping the Public Good: Women Making History in the Pacific Northwest

Release Month: October

Website: http://libarts.wsu.edu/history/faculty-staff/emeritus.asp

Occupation: Emerita Professor of History and Women’s Studies

Quick Fact: Armitage has coedited three collections of work by and about western women. Her forthcoming book focuses on women—famous and little-known alike—who helped shape Pacific Northwest society.

 

 

Author: Ellen Eisenberg Eisenberg

Book: Embracing a Western Identity: Jewish Oregonians, 1849-1950

Release Month: October

Website: http://willamette.edu/cla/history/faculty/eisenberg/

Occupation: Professor of American History

Quick Fact: Eisenberg’s publication coincides with the Oregon Jewish Museum’s online exhibit and documentary centered around the Oregon Jewish experience. This title will be followed by a second book documenting the decades following 1950.

 

 

Author: Dale Soden Soden

Book: Outsiders in a Promised Land: Religious Activists in Pacific Northwest History

Release Month: October

Website: http://www.whitworth.edu/academic/Faculty/index.aspx?username=dsoden

Occupation: Professor of History

Quick Fact: Soden maintains a collection of historic photos of Washington state, most of which contain themes of power and transportation. You can view some of them here.

 

 

Author: Lawrence A. Landis Landis

Book: A School for the People: A Photographic History of Oregon State University

Release Month: October

Website: http://osulibrary.oregonstate.edu/staff/landisl

Occupation: Director of OSU Libraries’ Special Collections & Archives Research Center

Quick Fact: When visiting OSU’s archives, turn to Landis for help with OSU history, historic photographs, preservation of archival materials, digital collections, and historic preservation issues.

 

 

Editor: Lorraine Anderson, assisted by Abby Phillips Metzger WildintheWillamette

Book: Wild in the Willamette: Exploring the Mid-Valley’s Parks, Trails, and Natural Areas

Release Month: November

Website: https://www.facebook.com/WildInTheWillamette

Occupation(s): This guidebook was created via contributions from forty-plus outdoor enthusiasts and noted writers.

Quick Fact: All proceeds from Wild in the Willamette will be donated to Greenbelt Land Trust. The book was inspired by the passion and work of Gail Achterman, former director of the Institute for Natural Resources at OSU.

 

 

Author: George Moskovita (Introduction by Carmel Finley and Mary Hunsicker) Moskovita

Book: Living Off the Pacific Ocean Floor: Stories of a Commercial Fisherman

Release Month: November

Occupation: Commercial fisherman

Quick Fact: Moskovita made his living off the sea for more than sixty years. This new edition of his fascinating memoir includes an introduction and notes from Finley, an historian of science, and Hunsicker, an aquatic and fisheries scientist.

 

 

Editors: Scott Slovic and Paul Slovic Slovic

Book: Numbers and Nerves: Information, Emotion, and Meaning in a World of Data

Release Month: November

Websites: http://www.uidaho.edu/class/english/scott-slovic | http://psychology.uoregon.edu/profile/pslovic/

Occupations: Professor of Literature & Environment | Professor of Psychology

Quick Fact: The Slovics are a father-son duo whose work studies systemic problems within cultural patterns and societies that prevent individuals from fully processing numerical information.

 

 

July 31st, 2015

 

We all know the ABC’s are easy as 123. But when it comes to understanding the complex world of publishing? The answers are often far from simple. That’s why we’ve created a short guide that’s as accessible as the alphabet (and hopefully scintillating enough to get the Jackson 5 song out of your head).

 

A**B**C**D**E**F**G

 

Acquisitions: The press department that decides which books to publish.

 

 

Backlist: Older books still available from a publisher. At OSU Press, our backlist generally contains titles published more than one year ago.

 

 

Copyright: A tricky subject! Designates ownership of the book’s printed material. copyright

 

 

Distributor: A middle-man organization that sells to retailers as opposed to consumers. We at OSU Press use the Chicago Distribution Center to store and process most of our books and sales.

 

 

E-book: The digital version of a published work. We proof our e-books on both Kindle and iBooks formats.

 

 

Frontlist: Newer titles published a press. Given the definition of “backlist” described above, this generally includes titles published in the last year. For further clarification, browse our catalog to see how books have been divided.

 

 

Grayscale: OSU Press books that only contain black and white images are printed right here GrayscaleBooksin the United States. The printing process is faster (and more economical!) than that of books with color images.

 

 

Hardcover: Although some of our titles feature hardcover bindings, most OSU Press books are published in paperback.

 

 

ISBN (International Standard Book Number): Essentially the literary version of a Social Security Number. A 13- or 10-digit number that uniquely identifies a title.

 

 

Journals: Although many academic presses publish journals, OSU Press currently does not.

 

 

Knowledge: It’s power! And here at OSU Press, we try to bring empowerment of the lightbulbregional variety, focusing mostly on works that incorporate the history, culture, and environment of the Pacific Northwest.

 

 

Line Edits: Comments and corrections made by editors who focus on more than just grammatical errors. Overall tone and style are also considered, leading to more detailed and nuanced suggestions.

 

 

Mighty M’s: Mary, Marty, and Micki—the lovely ladies who keep OSU Press running and relevant!

 

 

Networking: Presses must interact and make connections not only among colleagues, but with manufacturers, retailers, publicists, and distributors, as well. OSU Press employees attend several conferences and trade shows each year to network.

 

 

Out of Print: A book is only labeled “out of print” once inventory is depleted and no republication plans exist.

 

 

Page Proofs: One of the final stages before publication! Page proofs show everything Proofsexactly how it will appear in the printed book, including layout, color, and page numbers. These are often used for creating finalized indexes.

 

 

Questions: As a press, we receive all sorts of questions from writers and readers alike. Authors have several resources available through the Author Marketing Guide, but where should readers go when they have pressing questions? Email us at osu.press@oregonstate.edu and we’ll get back to you in a jiffy.

 

 

Reviews: Before publication, we send review copies of the manuscript to respected peers within the author’s field of work. Just like a scientific study, it’s important that academic books be tested and studied by other professionals before being published.

 

 

Slush: Nope, nothing like the blue raspberry-flavored goodness you find at 7-11. This refers stacksofpaperto the batch of unsolicited pitches and manuscripts sent to our acquisitions department.

 

 

Trade: Generally referring to the non-academic side of publishing, which includes large publishing houses and literary agents (and staff lists many times the size of that at OSU Press!).

 

 

University Presses: Publishing houses directly affiliated with an academic institution that typically focus on scholarly works. 

 

 

Value: Myriad factors determine the end price of a book, including printing and transportation costs, as well as the amount of time spent on writing, editing, and design.

 

 

Website: Found a book you liked on our website? Simply click the “add to cart” bar and pay online for the quickest way to receive your purchase. And if you prefer browsing the aisles of a brick-and-mortar bookstore? OSU Press titles are sold in dozens of shops across the nation, including the world-famous Powell’s.

 

 

X-out: Need to cross something out of a draft? Simply draw a line with a loop to signal the EditMarksdeletion of a word or phrase. We use a bevy of special marks when proofreading and editing drafts.

 

 

You: As a reader, you’re the key to academic presses’ longevity and success! We exist to perpetuate and expand scholarly conversations; without interest from participants like you, our publishing houses would quickly become obsolete.

 

 

Zoo: Yup, sometimes the publishing world can best be described as a zoo (you should see us all together at the annual Association of American University Presses conference!). But despite the chaos of deadlines and challenge of evolving technology, we academic presses are here to stay. Someone has to build the Ark, right?

 


A**B**C**D**E**F**G

 


This blog post made with inspiration from AuthorHouse.

July 23rd, 2015

The New Yorker dubbed it the “really big one.” Geologists have heralded its imminent approach for years. Broadcasters and bloggers have facilitated dozens of heated discussions regarding its potency and approach. But just how big is this earthquake truly supposed to be and how can we best prepare for its arrival?

 

Located along the Cascadia Subduction Zone, the Pacific Northwest is due for a devastating earthquake of epic proportions. After the social media explosion caused by Kathryn Schulz’s article in The New Yorker, the region’s residents have faced a deluge of information and speculation. Below is a list of resources from OSU Press and our friends at University of Washington Press to help explain the situation and filter fact from fiction.

 

•••••••••

 

The Next Tsunami TheNextTsunami

Living on a Restless Coast

Bonnie Henderson

ISNB-13: 978-0-87071-732-1

Oregon State University Press, 2014

 

The discovery of the Cascadia Subduction Zone didn’t happen overnight—and neither will a change in our infrastructure or political climate. Using the sleepy town of Seaside as a focal point, Henderson elucidates the charged intersection of science, human nature, and public policy.

 


 

Living with Earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest LivingwithEarthquakesinPacificNW

A Survivor’s Guide, Open Access Second Edition

Robert S. Yeats

ISBN-13: 978-0-87071-024-7

Oregon State University, 2004

 

An essential guide for anyone interested in understanding and preparing for the next big earthquake. Learn updated information about the Cascadia Subduction Zone in the forthcoming third digital edition.

 

 


The Orphan Tsunami of 1700 OrphanTsunami

Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America

Brian F. Atwater

ISBN-13: 978-0-29598-535-0

University of Washington Press, 2005

 

How can tectonic action along the North American coastline trigger an immense tsunami in Japan? Tug on your detective cap and delve into the primary resources and geological clues uncovered by Atwater.

 

 


Living with Thunder LivingwithThunder

Exploring the Geologic Past, Present, and Future of the Pacific Northwest

Ellen Morris Bishop

ISBN-13: 978-0-87071-748-2

Oregon State University Press, 2014

 

Stunning color photographs, maps, and charts introduce new readers to the field of geology. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, this beautiful book recounts the region’s past climate record and discusses implications for the future.

 

 


Oregon Geology OregonGeology

Sixth Edition

Elizabeth L. and William N. Orr

ISBN-13: 978-0-87071-681-2

Oregon State University Press, 2012

 

“Caught between converging crustal plates, the Pacific Northwest faces a future of massive earthquakes and tsunamis.” The future may be riddled with uncertainty, but the geologic features visible today may unlock the story of the past—and prepare us for what’s to come.

 

 


Living with Earthquakes in California LivingwithEarthquakesinCali

A Survivor’s Guide

Robert S. Yeats

ISBN-13: 978-0-87071-493-1

Oregon State University Press, 2001

 

California has climbed the ranks to become one of the world’s most advanced localities in terms of earthquake safety and preparedness. Yeats describes the state’s innovate approach, simultaneously offering a how-to-manual for life in earthquake country.

 


•••••••••


Browse the Association of American University Press's Books for Understanding website for more resources on current events and breaking news.

July 9th, 2015

“ … the power of citizen science is not going to be kept in a tidy box. The potential of citizen science will still surprise us.”

-Sharman Apt Russell

 

Power and surprise: two intriguing elements of any person’s life.  There are reasons why people revel in the unexpected and yearn for power; such heady feelings offer welcome interruptions to the repetition of daily life. And according to OSU Press author Sharman Apt Russell, the field of citizen science offers both.

 

The aforementioned quote appears in Russell’s provoking Diary of a Citizen Scientist, DiaryofaCitizenScientistpublished in 2014. A teacher and amateur scientist herself, Russell uses her own experiences to demonstrate the growing field’s immense personal and public benefit. Diary of a Citizen Scientist encourages readers to pursue their passions, all the while contributing to something bigger than themselves. Luckily for her readers, there is no dearth of diverse opportunities. In fact, a growing project facilitated in part by Oregon State University researchers centers around the very idea of “bigger.”

 

Introducing “the blob”: an abnormally warm section of the Pacific Ocean, located just off the western coast of the United States. Researchers at OSU and the University of Oxford believe the warmer water may correlate with current drought conditions and unusual weather patterns. Based upon the knowledge that ocean temperatures affect continental weather conditions, the scientists theorize that the blob and Oregon’s current heat wave are far from mutually exclusive. In order to prove—or disprove—their hypotheses, however, a computer model comparing historic data with present conditions must be run thousands of times. That’s where you come in!


 ClimatePrediction

 

The research team is looking for capable volunteers willing to download and run the climate model on their personal computers. The program, according to a report by the Oregonian, runs while the computer is not in use, but pauses automatically whenever the owner begins utilizing his or her device. Thanks to an accompanying set of detailed graphics, volunteers can watch the project and data coalesce instantaneously.

 

“People can watch the results unfold in real time,” Phil Mote, director of the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute, told the Oregonian. “Volunteers can find out at the same time we do.”

 

To participate in the project, simply put on your citizen scientist cap and follow the instructions on www.climateprediction.net. Within minutes, you’ll be contributing to a study that may solve the mystery of western North America’s persistent drought.

 

WesternDroughtGIF

GIF from www.climateprediction.net

 


Russell explains the prevalence and importance of such projects at the very beginning of Diary of a Citizen Scientist by noting that “citizen science projects are proliferating like the neural net in a prenatal brain,” completely reshaping the way research is conducted. Who knows: maybe it’s time for you to spark some synapses yourself and be a part of the research revolution.

July 2nd, 2015

Cultural traditions and customs permeate nearly every aspect of our lives. Whether at AttheHearthoftheCrossedRaceshome, in the workplace, or parked in front of the television, we all prescribe in some way to the social guidelines and expectations tied to our cultural identities. But what does “culture” mean and where does it originate? Dr. Melinda Jetté, associate professor of history at Franklin Pierce University, tackles this complex issue in her latest book, At the Hearth of the Crossed Races: A French-Indian Community in Nineteenth-Century Oregon, 1812-1859.

 

In her work, Jetté examines the community of French Prairie in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, adding depth and cultural diversity to the popular Anglo pioneer narrative of the region. An astounding mix of French and Native American culture formed the foundations of French Prairie—a tantalizing and often overlooked history unearthed by At the Hearth of the Crossed Races. Jetté joins us today to reveal the inspiration and passion behind her work.

 

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As a youngster growing up in the Portland area during the 1970s, I imbibed a steady diet of popular culture through television, film, and radio. This included the great heyday of the American miniseries, musical variety shows, disco music, reruns of Star Trek, and the start of the Star Wars franchise. These pop culture creations were all quite interesting and exciting, especially when my siblings—following the interests of my mother—became involved in the theater. However, my own intellectual interests seemed to lie elsewhere: in the family stories recounted by my father about his French Canadian and Indian ancestors who had lived in and around Champoeg and St. Paul. And although we had some Anglo ancestors who came along later, our French-Indian forebears were apparently in the Willamette Valley prior to the Oregon Trail migrations of the 1840s. These family stories from my father, along with his own love of history, influenced my later decision to study French and history in college and then pursue graduate studies in history. I would often return to the intriguing, though largely undocumented, history of the French-Indian settlers in French Prairie. I would ask myself why their experience seemed less important than that of the Anglo-Americans emigrants who trekked to the Pacific Northwest on the Oregon Trail.

 

At the Hearth of the Crossed Races attempts to answer this question by placing the French-Indian community of French Prairie at the heart of a formative and tumultuous period in Oregon’s history: the Euro-American colonization of the Pacific Northwest that began with the fur trade, the mass migration of Americans to the region, Indian wars and forced removal, and the eventual incorporation of Oregon into the United States on the eve of the Civil War. The book’s multi-dimensional history of a bicultural community follows the lives of ordinary people facing extraordinary times—not only in relation to Native peoples and incoming American settlers, but also in relation to larger historical events and developments such as the transition to a modern, commercial economy and the institution of a civil society grounded in modern notions of racial separation, gender distinction, and social exclusion. What makes the story of French Prairie inhabitants so interesting is how their lives and decisions illuminate these changing times. In tracing the social history of the French-Indian community of French Prairie—warts and all—I have endeavored to dig deeper into Oregon’s history, to contribute to a more complex representation of the nineteenth century and to a more thorough understanding of the era’s ongoing legacy in the present. At the Hearth of the Crossed Races is the beginning of a lifelong journey to document the history of French North Americans in the United States. The next project awaits!

 

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Melinda Marie Jetté maintains roots in the very community she studies. A native Oregonian, she is a descendant of the French Canadians and Native women who resettled French Prairie. Having received an MA in History from Université Laval and a PhD from the University of British Columbia, she now teaches as Associate Professor of History at Franklin Pierce University in New Hampshire.

 

Dr. Jetté will make several appearances in the Pacific Northwest this summer. See her schedule below:

 

·       Wednesday, July 8 at 11:45 AMOPB Think Out Loud (Radio)

·       Wednesday, July 8 at 7 PM – Oregon Historical Society

·       Thursday, July 9 at 7 PM – Washington State Capital Museum

·       Saturday, July 11 at 1:30 PM – Benton County Historical Society & Museum 

·       Sunday, July 12 at 1 PM – Champoeg State Historic Area

·       Monday, July 13 at 12 PM – Chehalem Senior Center

·       Saturday, July 18 at 12-3 PM – Sons & Daughters of Oregon Pioneers (Champoeg State Historic Area) 

June 17th, 2015

Utopia (n.): a place of ideal perfection especially in laws, government, and social conditions.

 

The definition of utopia itself is simple to comprehend. It’s the description of a perfect place to live, a locality where everyone coexists and acts in pursuit of collective security and benefit. It’s a worthy goal to strive for, something we as humans would all arguably enjoy. Yet no such utopia has ever existed for an extended period of time. Why? Because the implementation of such an idea is far from effortless.

 

Both our front and back lists contain titles which explore the pursuits of pure utopias. Each with a slightly different approach, these books comprise a fascinating narrative of coexistence, couched in the Pacific Northwest’s rich history as a haven for communal living.

 

 

Naked in the Woods

My Unexpected Years in a Hippie Commune NakedintheWoods

By Margaret Grundstein

 

In 1970, Margaret Grundstein abandoned an Ivy League education to follow her activist husband into the backwoods of Oregon. There, they lived with ten friends and a rotating cadre of strangers, building what they believed to be a version of utopia. Resources grew scarce and relationships frayed, leaving Grundstein faced with difficult questions of feminism, labor, and love. A gripping memoir, Naked in the Woods forces readers to explore the boundaries of their own human nature and societal expectations.

 

 

Eden Within Eden

Oregon’s Utopian Heritage EdenWithinEden

By James J. Kopp

 

Since the establishment of the Aurora Colony in 1956, Oregon has housed nearly three hundred communal experiments. Ranging from the religious and Socialist groups of the nineteenth century to the ecologically conscious communities of the current century, Kopp’s work serves as the first comprehensive source for the state’s rich utopian history. Eden Within Eden will intrigue readers with its rich detail and encompassing look at broader social, political, economic, and cultural aspects of Oregon’s history.

 

 

Trying Home

The Rise and Fall of an Anarchist Utopia on Puget Sound TryingHome

By Justin Wadland

 

Structured around a series of linked narratives, Kopp’s work traces the history of Home, Washington, an anarchist colony founded in 1896 to promote freedom and tolerance in the midst of a rigid Gilded Age society. Over time, the community became notorious for its open rejection of contemporary values; members were arrested, sent to the Supreme Court, and even turned into private spies. More than a simple history, Trying Home offers insights and reflections from the author as complex as the community about which he writes.

 

 

Building a Better Nest

Living Lightly at Home and in the World BuildingaBetterNest

By Evelyn Searle Hess

 

Surrounded by ever-increasing levels of technology and modernization, how can we lead sustainable and responsible lives? Building a Better Nest delves into this question through the author’s own adventures in home construction.  Writing with unfailing wit and humor, Hess looks for answers in such places as neuroscience, Buddhism, and her ancestral legacy. Sustainability, she discovers, is all about cooperation. Well, that and active attention to the local watershed, and the widening income gap, and disappearing species, and overtaxed resources, and …  Suffice it to say, sustainable living requires a lifetime of cultivation. Follow Hess’s progress and method in Building a Better Nest.

 

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Beginning definition taken from the Merriam-Webster dictionary.

June 15th, 2015

Summer is nigh upon us, and do you know what that means? It’s time to hike—and walk, and run, and bike, and paddle—your way through the beautiful Pacific Northwest! But before you embark on any adventures, browse the books below to see which field guides and handbooks might serve as helpful companions.

 

 

Field Guide to Oregon Rivers

By Tim Palmer FieldGuidetoORRivers

 

Our most popular field guide profiles 120 Oregon rivers, offering a bevy of color photographs, history, and tips for all manner of outdoor enthusiasts. Described by WaterWatch of Oregon Executive Director John Devoe as “an essential tool for anyone who paddles, fishes, explores, and wants to understand the natural history of our rivers,” Palmer’s work serves as an unprecedented reference for Oregonians and visitors alike.

 

 

Field Guide to the Sedges of the Pacific Northwest

By the Carex Working Group FieldGuidetoSedgesofPacNW

 

This updated second edition offers a comprehensive look at the Pacific Northwest’s 169 Carex sedge species. Notoriously difficult to identify, sedges can be tackled using this helpful guide, which contains more than 650 color photographs and distribution maps. Learn the tricks of the trade employed by botanists and ecologists to use in your own gardening, landscaping, or citizen science pursuits.

 

 

Dragonflies and Damselflies of Oregon: A Field Guide DragonfliesandDamselflies

By Cary Kerst and Steve Gordon

 

Catered to naturalists, conservationists, and wildlife enthusiasts with all levels of experience, this companion guide includes stunning, vibrant photographs of Oregon’s Odonates and identification tips. Take the guide with you on any excursion to learn more about the distribution, habits, and natural history of the order.

 

 

Handbook of Oregon Birds: A Field Companion to Birds of Oregon HandbookofORBirds

By Hendrik G. Herlyn and Alan L. Contreras

 

The essential guide to Oregon ornithology, the Handbook provides a detailed field reference for birders interested in seasonal patterns, habitat information, and breeding and winter maps. Intended for more experienced birders, the guide includes specialized identification aids on such challenges as flying alcids and immature swallows.

 

 

Macrolichens of the Pacific Northwest Macrolichens

By Bruce McCune and Linda Geiser

 

A useful guide for both beginners and specialists, this revised edition includes keys to 586 lichen species in Oregon and Washington and some parts of Idaho and Montana. With an emphasis on forested ecosystems, Macrolichens offers users an illustrated glossary, as well as ecological challenges like air quality currently faced by the species. The guide includes more than 240 color photographs for improved identification.

 

 

Handbook of Northwestern Plants HandbookofNWPlants

By Helen M. Gilkey and La Rea J. Dennis

 

Valuable to botany students and beginners, this revised handbook helps identify hundreds of plants found between the Cascade Mountains and Pacific Coast. Educational components include a glossary of botanical terms and a host of illustrations that highlight indentifying details. For years, The Handbook of Northwestern Plants has been widely used as the premiere guide for plants in western Washington and Oregon.

 

 

Land Snails and Slugs of the Pacific Northwest LandSnailsandSlugs

By Thomas E. Burke

 

Turn to this field guide for the definitive authority on the animal kingdom’s second largest phylum. Browse its pages for information on the snails and slugs of Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and western Montana.  As a reference, Land Snails and Slugs provides rich illustrations, characteristic traits, and biogeography details.

 

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Still looking for more inspiration for your outdoor adventures? Look through our entire collection to learn more about conservation, ecological history, and the state’s best kept natural secrets.

June 4th, 2015

Citizens and the media regularly subject American politicians’ lives to public scrutiny. We hear about scandals. We hear about philanthropic visits and awards. We hear about financial troubles and financial successes. Yet rarely do we receive a holistic portrait of such political leaders, one that covers their lives unflinchingly and honestly, yet with tact. Author and historian William G. Robbins manages to do just that. He joins us today to discuss the impetus behind his latest work, A Man for All Seasons: Monroe Sweetland and the Liberal Paradox.

 

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Monroe Sweetland’s name first emerged in a graduate seminar at the University of Oregon in the late 1960s—as I recall—associated with a romantic sounding, radical political organization, the Oregon Commonwealth Federation.  Sweetland’s name surfaced again decades later at a labor history meeting in Portland where a friend identified him as the person who asked a question from the back of the room.  In subsequent visits to Portland I would occasionally see him in the vicinity of Portland State University, white cane in hand and usually in the company of a graduate student.

 MonroeSweetland

Sweetland, who suffered from macular degeneration, had been legally blind since the early 1990s.  Then, shortly after his death in 2006, my longtime friend Steve Haycox (University of Alaska, Anchorage) urged me to write Sweetland’s biography.  “You’re the right person to do his biography,” he enthused.  I begged off, already heavily invested in a big research project on insurgent movements in the American West.  But the amorphous nature of that venture prompted me to consider something more definitive, a problem that reminded me of the Peanuts’ character, Lucy, who was reading a book—“A man was born, he lived and he died.  The End.”  

 

With that heady sentiment in mind, I contacted Steve who put me in touch with Barbara Sweetland Smith, Monroe’s oldest daughter.  A computer search of his name found page upon page of links!  What I discovered was a person who led a fascinating and multifaceted life, living through the cultural revolution of the 1920s, the radical politics of the Great Depression, the island-hopping campaign of American forces in the Pacific during the Second World War, the fear-provoking politics of the Cold War, the civil rights and antiwar protests of the 1960s and early 1970s, and the conservative swing in American politics with the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980.  Through a remarkably active life, Monroe Sweetland took part for seven decades to advance the welfare of the disadvantaged, the disenfranchised, and the less fortunate.  He was truly A Man for all Seasons.1

 

Sweetland’s long public career provides a literal tour through Oregon and national history since 1930—field organizer for the socialist League for Industrial Democracy in the early 1930s, founder of the radical Oregon Commonwealth Federation in 1937, field director for the CIO War Relief Committee in 1941, two years with the Red Cross in the Pacific, publisher of Oregon weekly newspapers, 1948-1963, member of the Oregon legislature 1952-1963, journalism lecturer in Indonesia 1963-1964, and legislative director of the thirteen western states for the National Education Association (NEA), 1964-1975.  Already well known to leading national political figures, Sweetland achieved two major accomplishments with NEA—he was the principal architect of the Bilingual Education Act of 1968 and led the agency’s push for the age-eighteen vote, the Twenty-Sixth Amendment, in 1971.

 

The always optimistic Sweetland was confident that rational liberal policies would democratize and humanize social and political institutions.  While most Americans today may not share that vision, Monroe was incapable of believing there was any erosion to America’s promise.  With his friends and associates alike, Sweetland was rooted in the real world of success and failure, of admirers and detractors, but he never lost faith that rational good will would prevail.  That mood, that sense of buoyancy, inspired others, perhaps no one more than his traveling companion with NEA, Rey Martinez, who remarked: “There is hardly a day goes by that I don’t think of Monroe.  Every fiber of his being is seared in my memory.  I never walked with a greater human being.”  At Monroe’s memorial service in September 2006, his granddaughter, Kate Sweetland-Lambird, thanked Monroe for teaching her to dance, “to debate with knowledge to back up my arguments, to have a sense of humor about life and live each day in service to others.”

 

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1A Man for all Seasons is the title of Robert Bolt’s 1966 Academy Award-winning film of Thomas More, the 16th century counsellor to England’s King Henry VIII, who refused to sanction the king’s divorce so that he could marry another woman.  For his principled stand, More was tried and executed.

 

 

William G. Robbins, Emeritus Distinguished Professor of History at Oregon State University from 1971 to 2002, is the author and editor of several books, including Monroe Sweetland. Following a four-year enlistment in the U.S. Navy, he earned a B.S. degree from Western Connecticut State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Oregon. He is currently at work on the sesquicentennial history of Oregon State University as a land-grant institution.

 

May 28th, 2015

History may be made in a variety of ways. But when Oregon’s only two female governors join forces, it’s bound to be memorable.

 

RoseFestivalFormer governor Barbara Roberts, who held the seat from 1991 – 1995, will join current Governor Kate Brown in leading the 2015 Portland Rose Festival’s Grand Floral Parade. The two politicians have been named grand marshals and will march at the forefront of the parade, scheduled for 10 a.m. on June 6.

 

According to the event website, committee members chose the grand marshals to “salute the leadership and statesmanship of these two women, who have helped make Oregon such a great state to live in and visit.” The accomplishments and contributions of Roberts and Brown are indeed extensive.

 

Kate Brown gained the office in February after serving as Secretary of State, a result of former governor John Kitzhaber’s resignation.  Upon being sworn in, Brown promised to work toward restoring unity and public trust in the governmental system.  Brown’s prior accomplishments include becoming the first woman to serve as Oregon senate majority leader and updating the state’s campaign finance reporting system.

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Two decades before, Barbara Roberts had charted unknown political territory, serving as the state’s very first female governor. Facing political and societal stigmas, Roberts worked hard to pursue goals of improved public education and the protection of human rights. Roberts’s governorship is also remembered for its focus on tax reforms and environmental interests. In 2011, she published a memoir chronicling her unlikely rise to power, titled Up the Capitol Steps. OSU Press is proud to announce that the Rose Festival Association provided a copy of the memoir to each princess on the 2015 Rose Court.

 

“I am so honored to be joining governor Kate Brown as Grand Marshal of Portland’s 2015 Grand Floral Parade,” Roberts wrote in a news release covered by the Oregonian. “As the only two women who share the historic role as Oregon Governors, we look forward to celebrating with Portland and with Oregon in our state’s equally historic Grand Floral Parade.”

 

With these two influential women at the helm, the parade promises to live up to its 2015 theme and be a “bloomin’ good time.”

May 21st, 2015

 

How does one define “better”? It’s a question redolent of philosophy, but one that applies to nearly every aspect of our lives. In her forthcoming book, Building a Better Nest, Evelyn Searle Hess tackles this all-encompassing question. Hess joins us today to discuss the very essence of her work and share what we as a global community may do to live fulfilled, harmonious lives.

 

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As the story unfolds of building our first house in over a decade and a half, Building a Better Nest asks the question, “What is ‘better’ not just for the individual or family, but also for the ecosystem, the community and the world?” Unfortunately, the road is long and bumpy between defining “better” and being able to do anything about it.

 

First we must acknowledge the extent of the mess our species has made of our planet: disappearing species, polluted air and water, widening income gap, climate craziness, acidification of rising seas, blown-up mountains, destroyed ecosystems and more. Then we come face to face with myriad roadblocks to rerouting that relentless march to annihilation: our economic system that favors growth, progress and the bottom line over all things natural; our society’s acceptance of acquisition as a symbol of success and of convenience and comfort as necessities for happiness; the continuing divorce of humanity from the natural world, and the innate human fear of change. How do we build a better nest in the face of an economy, social goals and our own lizard brains all hell-bent for destruction of that very nest?

 

Neuroscience shows that people’s happiness conflates with their expectations. Corporate advertisers exploit this fact regularly, directing our expectations toward more, newer and fancier. But we can choose to define our own goals in self- and nature-affirming ways, rather than letting the P.R. folks be the designers of our dreams. If we can imagine a better world, we can make it so. Rather than profit for the CEO and shareholders, the bottom line we strive for could be happiness for the 99% and healthy ecosystems. We could learn to look forward to a productive backyard garden rather than a second car, to cooperative ventures rather than exploitive ones, to the rewards of doing work we love rather than working for status.

 

If we accept the challenge of living our own best lives, we will find concert in a community where almost everyone yearns for more authenticity and meaning. That community can stretch beyond a clutch of friends to the neighborhood and distant reaches until it finds the strength to influence legislation and inspire the production of sustainable technologies. And that community may recognize itself as part of a bioregion that includes air, water and soil required for life, along with all of the other creatures sharing that air, water and soil, from the most miniscule to the immense, from the floating and the swimming, the wriggling and the creeping, the galloping and the flying, to the sprouting and flowering and leafing and towering. And we will then know that saving the individual requires saving each other and our life-giving biosphere.

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This is not a pipe dream. Like building a house from its foundation, all-important movements for change begin from the bottom—with people committed to a vision and brave enough to defy the accepted norm. The damage already done to this planet is such that major change is already on its way, but if we choose now to live as responsibly as possible--simply, attentively, cooperatively and empathetically--we can not only mitigate the damage, we can learn and teach our children how to live more rewarding and harmonious lives.

 

As Building a Better Nest tracks the building of the house and plumbs ancestral memories, it seeks to understand the myriad connections essential to all species and the societal and personal strictures that limit our ability to honor and conserve those connections. The book will do its job if it provokes conversation. May we grab the controls of our careening ship to give this blue planet and our children a fighting chance.

 

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Evelyn Searle Hess is the author of two books published by OSU Press, including the forthcoming Building a Better Nest: Living Lightly at Home and in the World. Having worn a variety of hats in her lifetime—including teacher, gardener, nursery owner, and garden designer—she now lives along southern Oregon’s Coast Range, weeding, writing, and trying to put up her garden produce before the critters get it. Her 2010 book, To the Woods, earned a WILLA Literary Award for Best Creative Nonfiction.

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